Believe You Are Enough

Here’s a challenge: How about some honest soul-searching? Come on – stay with me – it’ll be fun! Okay, it probably won’t be fun if you actually are honest. But let’s give it a go.

I’ll start.

Most of my life I have not allowed myself to admit that I screw-up. I make instant judgments about other people’s behavior, or the way they dress. I become a modern day Job when God seems to be pushing my buttons or ignoring my demands. I decide daily how things should be and then set out to make myself, you, and God conform. It’s a full-time job – let me tell you. Oh wait! Maybe I don’t have to tell you. Maybe you know exactly what I’m talking about.

I should, you should, we should, they should, trees should, rocks should, animals should, the weather should, God should. Have I left anything out? We are obsessed with shoulds and calculate daily, almost moment-by-moment, what should be. Then we adjust our lives accordingly. My boss should be nicer, my kids should be more respectful, my husband should do the laundry, I should let go of that hurt.

What if you were given the power to enact all the most significant shoulds you have ever envisioned? What would they be? This is pretty broad so let’s make three catagories:

  • My shoulds.
  • Everyone else’s shoulds.
  • God’s shoulds

Let’s begin with these: (Perhaps if you are so inclined you could reply with your own list.)

My shoulds:

  • I should be thinner, smarter, prettier, healthier; exercise more and eat less.
  • I should be more forgiving and less judgmental.
  • I should spend less time on the internet and more time with God.
  • I should quit counting offenses against me and begin counting my blessings.
  • I should be perfect by now.
  • Chocolate should not be fattening (it’s my list!)

Everyone else’s shoulds:

  • People should be more generous and less self-serving.
  • Wicked people should not prosper.
  • People should love and accept each other.
  • People should mind their own business.
  • People should be more like me.
  • Chocolate should not be fattening.

God’s should’s:

  • God should not allow suffering – especially for Christians.
  • God should punish all wicked, sinful people – except me.
  • God should make people behave.
  • There should be some reward for those who are good…like…hum…I know! Chocolate would not be fattening for us – no one else – just us! (See how easily I slip myself in here?)

God created everything and when He was finished He said, “AWESOME – even if I do say so myself!” Now think about that. As soon as God created everything on the earth He declared it “good”. He doesn’t wait until we prove ourselves for him to admire his work.  He doesn’t bemoan giving us free wills when we go our own way. “Well, okay, I could have tweaked that goofy Linda Russell a bit, but nobody’s perfect.”

 And there it is people!

NO ONE THAT GOD CREATED IS PERFECT! And that includes you dear. Sorry to have to burst your bubble.

No one is without fault. Romans 3:10-12 tells us, “There is none righteous, no, not one; There is none who understands; There is none who seeks after God. They have all turned aside; They have together become unprofitable. There is none who does good, no, not one.”

Not one stinkin’ one of us.

Why is that so hard for us to accept? I believe I know. It is because we are not willing to be vulnerable or have the courage to be imperfect. I know. I have lived most of my life refusing to believe the simple truth that I AM ENOUGH, which, in turn, does not allow me to accept you or God as enough.

God tells us that we should have the faith of a child. Unfortunately, for me, as a child I was made to believe, by those who were supposed to take care of my tender heart, that I was not good enough; not worthy of love. I eventually stopped allowing myself to be vulnerable and tried desperately to hide as much of my imperfections as possible. I still do at times. I could not accept my own brokenness or the brokenness of others. I viewed everyone and everything through that lens, even God.  Everyone was suspect.  This is the false-self Richard Rohr speaks of often:

The false self is your psychological creation of yourself in space and time. It comes from your early conditioning, family, roles, education, mind, culture, and religion. The false self is who you think you are! But thinking doesn’t make it so. The false self dies and passes away. Yet it is the raw material through which you discover your True Self in God.

Ever so gradually, as I sat longer in prayer with God; as I grew to realize that He could be trusted with my fragile heart – that heart began to change. As I began to recognize the presence of a Holy Spirit within me that not only admonished me for my sinfulness, but loved me in spite of it, I was able to grow and change. I began to love and accept myself and others in a way I had never experienced before. All the hurts and pain of my past; hurts inflicted on me and hurts I exacted on myself and others began to lose their stronghold on me.

Now, Saint Mother Theresa I am not. I still do, and am sure I always will, screw up. But, here’s what I believe is critical for all of us – our perception of just Who and What the Holy Spirit is. This is what I think of when I hear those immortal words, “Come Holy Spirit.” Really? What is the Spirit, some kind of Ninja Spirit hanging out till we summon Him in desperation? Or, better yet, it’s that kid who’s always the bench-warmer. Waiting and praying for someone to get whacked so he can get in the game and show what he’s made of. We will summon him, but only after we try to fix things ourselves.

The problem with all that is that as soon as you became a believer the Spirit took up residence within your very soul. That Spirit lives and works and has it’s being within us 24/7. Not just when it’s convenient for us. Of course, we would prefer He be “on-call” because the idea of Him “hanging out” there conjures up all kinds of frightful thoughts. Being “busted” comes to mind for me.

charlie-brown-aaugh

Let me tell on myself here. And believe me, this occurs a lot! Here’s what happens when you arrive at the place where you can hear God’s still small voice through the thunder of your own wretchedness. Often, I will become defensive with someone and strike out at them in an effort to preserve my fragile ego. Often, I begin like this, “You should have, or should not have, done ________(fill in the blank). There, I got it out. I’m feeling better already. Never mind how it made you feel!

Then it comes, almost immediately, “So, Linda…yeah…what he/she did was pretty stupid (ego still intact)”.

Wait for it…

wait for it…

“Awe. Wait. Linda. Remember, just last week when you did the exact same thing? Remember?” (Shoot! Busted! “Why couldn’t You be somewhere else right now instead of all up in my business?”) And off I go to apologize. But, it’s okay. I laugh at myself and carry on. We have to laugh at ourselves or this whole business of acceptance fails to work because we become too overwhelmed with our failures and sorrows.

Let’s call it getting back to basics. God calls us to the childlike innocence, love, and joy that He originally created. Children are full of contagious laughter, silliness, trusting innocence, vulnerability, acceptance of all of creation, curiosity, and, yes, imperfection.

If you have expectations for yourself and others that are beyond human capacity, you will always be disappointed. We are all broken and incapable of being the perfect parent or child or friend or neighbor. God calls us in our suffering to lean in on Him and draw life and fullness from Him. Understanding that helped me to forgive my mother long ago. As a child I hated her, as an adult I realized she did the best she could. She was simply not capable of being the mother I so needed her to be. Remember, even Jesus became frustrated with His own disciples, “Geeeezzzz. How long must I put up with you!?” (Mark 9:19) Okay, He didn’t say “geeeezzzzz”, but you get the idea.

So, cut yourself and others some slack. Like Father Rohr says:

Once we have learned to discern the real and disguised nature of both good and evil we recognize that everything is broken and fallen, weak and poor—while still being the dwelling place of God—you and me, your country, your children, your marriage, and even your church and mosque and synagogue. That is not a put-down of anybody or anything, but actually creates the freedom to love imperfect things! As Jesus told the rich young man, “God alone is good!” (Mark 10:18)

So, come on, let’s begin with a simple step: laugh at yourself at least once today and then sit down with the Holy Spirit for awhile, be quiet, and contemplate the experience. Let me know how that turns out. (I do love to hear from you, even if you think I’m an idiot. It’s okay. I can take it.)

Alex-wearing-a-bra-225x300
My grandson is going to hate me for this one day.

 

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